When the VA announced it was cutting more than half of its hospitals and nursing homes by 2019, the medical community was not pleased.

But it’s not the only part of the VA that is facing tough decisions.

It also faces cuts that are affecting the other parts of the agency, too.

We’ve dug into some of the bigger picture, and the biggest changes are affecting healthcare providers and nursing home providers, said Karen Cate, a senior fellow at the American Association of University Health Systems.

The VA and nursing care in general are going through some major transitions, and that’s part of why this is a very challenging time for healthcare providers.

“The health care system in the United States is a complicated system,” Cate said.

The VA is in the midst of the biggest medical cutbacks in its history, and it has been one of the most highly rated hospitals in the country.

The cuts are not only hurting hospitals but nursing homes as well.

Many nursing homes are operating on a tight budget, and there is a lack of skilled nursing professionals, which is one of many reasons they have experienced challenges, said Carol A. Moulton, director of the Center for the Study of Nursing Home Management at Rutgers University.

“It’s really a tough place to operate,” Moulston said.

Moulton and others are calling for a restructuring of the healthcare system in general.

That means ensuring that the services that are provided to their veterans are up to par with the needs of the workforce,” Mollton said. “

The only way the VA is going to be successful is if they are doing the right things.

That means ensuring that the services that are provided to their veterans are up to par with the needs of the workforce,” Mollton said. 

“What’s also important is that the VA has to be accountable to the people who are paying for their care, and their healthcare is not going to work for everybody.

For example, the Medicare-for-all healthcare program that the Senate passed earlier this month was meant to help people in nursing homes who are suffering because of the loss of their jobs.

But the cuts are hitting the veterans’ health care, too, Moultons report notes.

If the VA were to close all its nursing homes, it would save about $20 billion a year, she added.

A lot of the veterans that are in these facilities, especially in rural areas, are not going in because of these issues. “

These savings could have been used to build better nursing homes,” she said.

“A lot of the veterans that are in these facilities, especially in rural areas, are not going in because of these issues.

It’s a combination of people who can’t afford the care and people who have lost their jobs.”

There is a growing concern that many veterans are dying waiting for care at the VA because of a lack or inability to find care at other VA facilities, such as the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Las Vegas.

According to the VA, about 2.7 million veterans have died waiting for VA care since the cuts began.

Veterans are also concerned about the impact of cuts on veterans’ healthcare. 

The VA says the healthcare cuts have already resulted in about 3,800 deaths, or about 3.5 percent of the population.

About 1.8 million people have died as a result of the cuts, the report says.

The report also notes that the percentage of people waiting for an appointment in the Veterans Health Administration has gone up in recent months.

But the VA says that there are still about 100,000 vets waiting for appointments in the VA system.

Veterans say the VA cuts are hurting the community and are not helping veterans.

“[Veterans] are seeing the effects of these cuts firsthand and it is affecting the quality of their healthcare,” Molyton said, referring to the increased costs and decreased quality of care that some vets are experiencing.

At the same time, the number of veterans seeking care in VA hospitals has gone down since the VA began cutting its hospitals by half.

Since April, the average number of VA visits per day has decreased by about a quarter, to 7.5.

Moultons report says that veterans are seeing their wait times and doctor appointments decrease due to the cost of caring for veterans and a drop in visits to specialists and other healthcare providers, especially those with physical or mental health issues.

“The cost of healthcare for veterans has gone way down, and we’re not seeing the number that we had before,” Moleton said of the decrease in visits.

“We’re seeing people having to make some very difficult choices about how they’re going to pay for their healthcare.”

Veterans Affairs officials have said that the hospital closures have reduced the number and type of cases that can be sent to specialty clinics. Cate

Tags: